Save $20,000 and protect your identity with this medical identity theft tip

Medical identity theft costs approximately $20,000 per case. Protect your identity by not succumbing to the pressures of medical front office personnel.

Social Security Number Fraud

The Social Security number offers an identity thief a prime identifier for his new identity theft score. Indeed, medical identity theft fraud has occurred when medical insiders grab a patient’s SSN and abuse it for personal gain.

Nearly every medical form I’ve seen over the past number of years asks for the patient’s Social Security number. Why would a medical provider need to have his/her patient’s Social Security number? While I do not know for sure, in my opinion, it is because they or the collection agency they retain want to be able to track and trace you IF you become delinquent on a bill.

What can you do about the danger of having your Social Security number in medical databases?

Mr. and Mrs. Assertive

Often, privacy advocates do not memorize their Social Security numbers and write “not memorized” in the space where all the sheeple provide their most personal and confidential identifier to the clerks who try and demand the SSN from patients.

It can be a costly expense to have your SSN stolen, not to mention the life-threatening dangers that could occur if someone stole your insurance policy just when you needed it for medical treatment.

Do all you can to prevent identity theft and medical identity theft in particular. One patient has been unable to straighten out his medical records-two years after an identity thief received $44,000.00 worth of treatment while using this identity theft victim’s identity.

Consumer privacy living principles will enable one to establish an identity theft prevention plan and escape the dangers and expense of a medical identity theft.

A Free identity theft prevention course is available by e-mail.

Can you save $20,000 when you see the doctor and prevent medical identity theft?

Consumer privacy goes a long way to prevent medical identity theft and the loss of $20,000 which is the amount such a crime costs, on average.

How to avoid medical identity theft

You’re fishing around trying to find a doctor for that…….er, problem. You know you should have made the appointment sooner, but….., oh well, maybe, it will go away. It didn’t.

After exhausting efforts, friends’ referrals, searches, and all of that, you found a doctor that will take you. You call to make¬† the appointment.

“What kind of insurance do you have,” asks Ms. Clerk III.

STOP!

It’s time for a re-education program in how to prevent medical identity theft.

Close up and personal

Do not give insurance information over the telephone. It’s fine to say, “with all due respect, Ms. Clerk III, I have identity theft challenges (don’t we all?), and I ain’t gonna part with my insurance number and group policiy number until I see the whites of your eyes”.

“What’s your social,?” she inquires.

STOP!

It’s always acceptable to just say, “no”. And that’s what you’ll do when she asks that. If you are smart, that is.

“Date of birth,?” she barks.

“When I come into the office, I will furnish all information necessary for Dr. Doolittlesonex to treat me, Ms. Clerk III,” he replies in a pleasant and authoritative tone.

I’ll see you in two and a half weeks. In the meantime, you have my name and telephone number. Please call if there is any reason why Dr. cannot keep the appointment. Otherwise, I’ll be there.”

Preventing medical identity theft summary

Mr. Assertive has accomplished a great deal to strengthen his identity theft prevention plan.

He has kept his insurance policy number confidential and not shared it with a stranger. In fact, that one secret can save you a huge financial loss. Did you know that medical identity theft is often an inside job. And, remember a medical identity theft costs on average, twenty big ones. Isn’t it worth it to you to become like Mr. Assertive?

The date of birth is an important identifier. Mr. Assertive properly avoided providing his to someone whom he does not know-an important identity theft prevention principle regardless of whether one is asked for it by a medical clerk or a guitar playing musician in Westwood.¬† Don’t give it up easily. Do it in person.

I don’t have my Social Security number memorized. Neither do many who stomp the woods trying to maneuver between the identity theft traps that potential identity thieves set for their unsuspecting prey. Don’t take the bait. Become like Mr. Assertive. Why would anyone memorize their “social” anyway?

FREE information on identity theft prevention/identity theft solutions may be found in our courses.

Thanks for reading.

Grant Hall