Do bankers understand money?

Inflation. CPI. Nonsensical terms to be sure. But ask any managerial level banker and they probably subscribe to those terms-meaningless, oxymoron-like, bordering on the absurd and in the vocabularies of all who make your mortgage and loan decisions.

Devaluation not inflation is the correct way to describe the erosion of purchasing power. However, in order to understand this correction in verbiage, it is necessary to first learn the basics, the fundamentals of any monetary system or medium of exchange without biases. An article which may be useful to understand the loss of purchasing power is located at:

http://www.privacycrisis.com/article_financial_privacy.htmlt:

Imagine people in a land with diverse products and services to sell. Mabel has a pie baking business and her husband Cleve has hogs and milk in excess supply. Art is a skilled mechanic and his brother Billy builds houses while their sister Ruth and her husband practice medicine and provide nursing services. Sue, their neighbor teaches school. Bret writes computer programs and provides search optimization services. May makes winter coats. Gabriel cuts hair. Charlie has used cars for sale. And three hundred other community members possess skills and services and have products for sale.

There is no accepted method of exchange in this fictional community.

Grant Hall wrote Privacy Crisis Banking and this book explains money and banking as well as business and investment privacy. The book is available as an e-book for immediate download at:

http://www.privacycrisis.com/orders_index.html

It becomes cumbersome for Cleve to hall hogs and milk to May’s store to trade like values for like values. Charlie wants Mabel’s pies for desert, but doesn’t want eleven hundred of them at once-the number that is valued to equal one of his used automobiles. And others face the same dilemma. How to “buy” goods and services? What to do?

A community meeting is held to establish a suitable and convenient means of exchange, a monetary system that can serve the consumers and survive without being devalued over time. This community is aware of what happened to previous currencies-those money systems that began at 100 and were devalued to 2 or 3 due to the instant gratification needs of the cons who initiated them in the first place without consent of those who eventually lost everything because of the Ponzi scheme. This responsible community is determined to establish a money system that works-without devaluation or “inflation,” that scam word that money creators conned everyone into believing was a normal phenomenon when in fact it is nonsense, a lie used to control and make a population poor within a hundred years or less, or much less depending on how much abuse is exercised by the controllers.

Property is held by the community in the form of farmland  and producing oil wells. The city hall and the surrounding buildings are also owned by “the state.” In addition, money is owned by the community which has been collected for revenues on these properties.  And there is an income stream from other diversified properties.

First, the value of all properties is determined as well as the bottom line figures  for all businesses. The final value is established based on the current value of spot Gold. Next, this figure is converted to the value of Gold in troy ounces. It is determined that this state owns property and current profits from their business that is the equivalent to 99,000 ounces of Gold at today’s price. With this value in mind, this community establishes a money system and a bank. The properties and business revenues remain owned by the community while the bank has the power to distribute receipts in paper or digital form up to the value of all their assets. Receipt issuing power is only increased when new business profits are generated and only up to that value per the value of the new profits. And this becomes the money policy of the people who own the money.

Stockholders or community members are entitled to their share of ownership of the property and may receive this ownership in the form of the receipts. Or their account is credited to equal their share and this account may be drawn from to buy goods and services.

A means of exchange has been established and commerce begins without the inconvenience associated with bartering hogs for coats and the like.

Devaluation of the community bank will only occur when the collateral behind the money receipts fluctuate in value such as a decrease in the price of oil and land and buildings and other property held by the community.

Market values only contribute to any debasement of the newly established currency.

J. Baily