Keep Your Privacy While Getting Medical Treatment

Can a privacy conscious person keep her privacy in the face of a serious disability? Will a long term illness or treatment for an injury compromise a person’s privacy lifestyle? These are questions many will face at some point in their lifetimes. This piece will address potential privacy compromising issues one will face during a period of illness.
Calling a physician’s office may be the first privacy medical hurdle one has to clear as medical office personnel often attempt to obtain your health insurance information prior to making an appointment. You will be asked for your insurance company name, your policy and certificate number, and the doctor’s assistant will verify your coverage and co payment amount as you’re on the telephone. Your name, address and telephone number will be required information. Often your e-mail address will be requested but not required. Social Security Numbers will sometimes be requested and it is possible to keep this important identifier mum-and it is recommended you do so. Grant’s books are clear about how important it is to keep your Social Security Number confidential as you prevent identity thieves and other criminals out of your life while living a privacy lifestyle. In fact, preventing medical identity theft should be a primary concern as you get treatment as medical identity theft is one of the fastest growing white collar crimes in the country.
Once you have met the basic requirements for a medium level privacy lifestyle and have this identity theft prevention plan system in place, you will be prepared to avoid unwanted privacy invasions when an emergency medical condition warrants medical treatment. Your mailing address will not lead anyone to your doorstep, the telephone number provided for medical treatment cannot be traced to you or your family, and you can meet the requirements of your medical providers while keeping yourself safe during this period of time. If you need guidance on how to get started, we have resources that will help.
Free personal privacy courses are available for those who wish to receive these by e-mail. Courses are written by Grant Hall, author of Privacy Crisis and Privacy Crisis Banking.

Guest post by Beth Oslowski