American work force costing you money?

The office supply store manager looked up the printing cartridge number, headed for the isle it was on and brought it to the register. One hundred and eleven buckoos later, I was out the door. The printer had flashed a warning indicating the ink was low and I had headed out to replace it as I expected some planned printing would deplete the supply entirely. Two weeks later, I opened the sealed package and discovered the manager had sold me a drum, not the cartridge I had ordered. Mistakes are acceptable, but today, I find the level of mistakes uncommon, and I attribute these mistakes to the illiteracy problem in America, as this problem is prevalent within our work force.

A recent call to an educator friend, a career teacher with a Master of Science Degree provided facts to support my view. This man said that over fifty percent of all high school attendees do not graduate high school in the state of California. The numbers are similar in Arizona and Nevada, I believe.

A friend of ours suffers from  residual pain from a traumatic injury. While at the doctor’s office, the medical assistant asked, “Mrs. Ellenns, how would you like to pay for your co-pay today, credit or debit card?” “Currency, she replied.”  She was met with a glazed look by the thirty-something year old assistant who returned to her station and asked her coworker what currency meant.

It took five store clerks in a large department store to sell me a computer component as I insisted in buying the product with cash and not providing my ISP subscription data to them to store in their database. Privacy carries a high price in terms of time and effort and is always a bit more expensive than living as the masses. And this time, effort, and money is a great  investment based on my many years of experience.

In 1971, everyone graduated from high school. Perhaps two or three of each one hundred students in my town had to take a summer course to satisfy a Math or English requirement  to get their diploma, but they did graduate. On a rare occasion, a student was not capable of doing high school work and did not graduate. This was rare and many with below average learning ability managed to complete the “required” twelve years of formal education. It was nearly impossible to get a job or join the military without a high school diploma. GED’s were frowned upon by many and seen as a last resort to gaining the high school equivalency of a twelve year formal education. In fact, the GED was called, “high school equivalency test,” and most who thought of dropping out of high school were counseled against it by well informed, experienced, high school educators and counselors.

I don’t know about you, but the current inabilities of the work force causes me to expend extra time, effort, and money. Never before do I recall having to repeat myself so often and go through so many people just to buy and obtain ordinary day to day goods and services. Is America now a third world country due to our devalued currency and uneducated work force?

Readers may e-mail Grant Hall at contact@PrivacyCrisis.com

Thanks.

Grant Hall

www.PrivacyCrisis.com

www.PrivacyCrisis.com/blog